Botox: Should You Get it? What You Should Know First

Botox: Should You Get it? What You Should Know First


 

Botox - Treatment

Botox, the most popular brand of neurotoxin and aesthetic treatment on the market.

Over the years, it has become socially accepted by society and is often associated with defying physical aging.

However, it continues to spark questions and fear among potential consumers.

Are you considering getting Botox?

In this article, I will answer all the questions you may have on what to expect, what it is used for, and things to consider before scheduling your first Botox appointment!

Neurotoxin

Trained injectors are using several brands of neurotoxins to help diminish the appearance and occurrence of fine lines and wrinkles. These brands include Botox, Dysport, and Xeomin, just to name a few.

Botox is a neuromuscular blocking agent which prevents wrinkle formation. When the muscle signal is blocked, it prevents the muscle from firing, therefore blocking wrinkle formation. Sure, this sounds great, but is it safe?

Is It Safe?

As a former aesthetic nurse, I highly recommend that you do your own research prior to selecting a practice and following through with injections. I wouldn’t go for Groupon’s ‘cheapest out there’ deal; in most cases, you get what you pay for.

In some states, RNs and NPs can inject neurotoxins. This is perfectly fine, just ensure that you look at their reviews as well as before and after photos, if possible.

When you hear that neurotoxins, specifically Botox, are made from botulinum toxin (otherwise known as the same toxin that causes botulism – a life-threatening form of food poisoning) it is a valid thought to immediately be put off.

So, the best thing that you can do is become an educated consumer.

Neurotoxin is only injected in small doses that are targeted into specific muscles. Therefore, it is imperative that you are treated by a trained injector.

But, to answer the overarching question, it is generally safe.

However, it is important to note that you should not receive Botox if you are pregnant and/or breastfeeding.

What Do You Want Out of Your Treatment?

Why are you considering getting Botox or a similar neurotoxin?

Do you want to have a refreshed look?

Are you wanting to prevent the development of fine lines and wrinkles?

Are you wanting to stop the aging process?

Whatever your reasoning may be, it is important to be realistic about the results of the treatment and take into consideration the price and effort of the upkeep.

The results are only temporary, lasting anywhere from 2-4 months, depending on the person.

On top of this, it isn’t a cheap habit to have.

Botox can cost anywhere from $10-$20 per unit, and the average person would receive 20 units per treatment; so, it can get pricey.

Prior to your first visit to your dermatologist, plastic surgeon, or another highly trained injector, try to pick your top priority of what you would like to correct, rather than going in wanting everything done; if not, you may walk out of your appointment a bit shellshocked.

Are you a candidate?

Neurotoxin injectables

Neurotoxin injectables such as Botox can prevent or temporarily correct fine lines and wrinkles, excess sweating, migraines, TMJ, neck spasms, and lazy eyes.

As previously stated, it is a generally safe procedure. If you are pregnant, breastfeeding, or have a neurological condition, or are allergic to cow’s milk, you should not get it.

Speak with your injector about any other specific concerns that you may have during your initial consultation, and they can provide you with advice.

Is it Painful?

This is one of the most common questions surrounding the topic of neurotoxin or Botox injections.

The toxin is injected with a very small needle and injected into the muscle, making the procedure relatively painless.

Some injectors will provide you with the option of applying topical numbing to the treatment area to provide a temporary analgesic effect. Otherwise, the treatment is perfectly tolerable without topical numbing.

In my experience, I would compare the needle stick to a very small bee sting without the continuous pain that follows.

What to Expect from Your Treatment?

Prepare for your treatment by arriving at your appointment with a clean face.

No makeup – au naturale.

When you walk into your appointment, your injector will assess your face and ask you about your primary goals (what we covered earlier). They may take before and after pictures so they can assess your progress after treatment.

While assessing your face and determining your goals, they will configure your dosage amount for your specific treatment.

Following, some may apply topical numbing; others may not.

Then your face will be prepped with an antibacterial of some sort, such as alcohol or Hibiclens solution, and from here they will perform the treatment.

What is extremely important to remember is that, unlike filler, the effects of neurotoxin are not immediately noticeable.

It depends upon the brand of neurotoxin that you receive as to when the product will begin to take effect; with Botox specifically, it can take up to 14 days to present itself.

Conclusion

Neurotoxin injections are the most popular cosmetic procedure today, and for a pretty good reason.

It is safe, effective, and can be used across all adult age ranges.

My final words of advice, just are sure to be an educated consumer and make sure an experienced, trained injector performs your treatment!

About The Author:

Morgan CurryMorgan Curry RN, BSN: Morgan serves as the Course Curriculum Executive Editor and Content Manager at NursingCECentral.com. Her extensive background in a Level I Trauma Hospital setting provides vast clinical insight into high octane clinical care, along with a deep understanding of specialized areas of nursing such as heart and lung transplants, ECMO, and cardiac surgery recovery. Morgan’s professional versatility also extends into the highly sought-after field of aesthetic nursing, with comprehensive experience in the plastic surgery field; including nurse leadership in PACU, PERI-OP, and OR departments.



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